Jaume Masip
Department of Social Psychology and Anthropology
 
Bisagra

The decline in truth bias over the statement: Is it caused by sender’s behavior, receiver’s heuristic processing, or perceptions of inconsistencies?

Street, C. N. H., & Masip, J. (in press). The source of the truth bias: Heuristic processing? Scandinavian Journal of Psychology. doi:10.1111/sjop.12204 People believe others are telling the truth more often than they actually are; this is called the truth bias. Surprisingly, when a speaker is judged at multiple points across their statement the truth […]

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Police officers and community members get stuck to their beliefs about behavioral deception cues despite their experience showing that other kinds of information are far more revealing

Masip, J., & Herrero, C. (in press). Police detection of deception: Beliefs about behavioral cues to deception are strong even though contextual evidence is more useful. Journal of Communication. doi:10.1111/jcom.12135 Research questions the validity of behavioral deception cues; however, people believe behavioral cues are reliable deception indicators. Police officers and community members indicated both how […]

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Can we detect lies with computers? Linguistic deception cues.

Hauch, V., Blandón-Gitlin, I., Masip, J., & Sporer, S. L. (in press). Are computers effective lie detectors? A meta-analysis of linguistic cues to deception. Personality and Social Psychology Review. doi:10.1177/1088868314556539 (Download) This meta-analysis investigates linguistic cues to deception and whether these cues can be detected with computer programs. We integrated operational definitions for 79 cues from […]

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Cognitive-load approaches to detect deception: Searching for cognitive mechanisms

Blandón-Gitlin, I., Fenn, E., Masip, J., & Yoo, A. (2014). Cognitive-load approaches to detect deception: Searching for cognitive mechanisms. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 18, 441-444. doi: 10.1016/j.tics.2014.05.004 A current focus in deception research is on developing cognitive-load approaches (CLAs) to detect deception. The aim is to improve lie detection with evidence-based and ecologically valid procedures. […]

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Are verbal content cues useful to detect false accusations? New research

Sporer, S. L., Masip, J., & Cramer, M. (2014). Guidance to detect deception with the Aberdeen Report Judgment Scales: Are verbal content cues useful to detect false accusations? American Journal of Psychology, 127, 43-61. In two studies we evaluated the efficiency of training raters with a short version of the Aberdeen Report Judgment Scales (ARJS-STV-S) […]

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Petición del Colectivo Carta por la Ciencia

Información general: Más abajo Más información: http://conimasdmasihayfuturo.com/carta-por-la-ciencia/ La carta: http://conimasdmasihayfuturo.com PARA FIRMAR: http://www.change.org/es/peticiones/aumentar-la-inversi%C3%B3n-en-i-d-i-evitando-as%C3%AD-el-%C3%A9xodo-masivo-de-nuestro-capital-humano Jaume   La pérdida acelerada de capital humano y recursos es imparable como muestran los recientes artículos aparecidos en toda la prensa. No son excepciones, la llamada “fuga de cerebros” es más bien una huida ante la desesperada situación de la I+D+i […]

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Overlooking the obvious: Incentives to lie may be a powerful deception cue

Bond, C. F., Jr., Howard, A. R., Hutchison, J., & Masip, J. (2013). Overlooking the obvious: Incentives to lie. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 35, 212-221. Over the years, people have searched for deception cues in the liar’s behavior. However, the sender’s incentives to lie might be more revealing than behavior. In Experiment 1, an […]

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Biases in publishing scientific articles, and suggestions on how to fix them

Only papers with significant results and an “interesting story” to tell are typically published and visible. The need to publish in high-impact journals to get promotion and grants is part of the problem. How many failures to replicate a published study lay in the researcher’s drawers? To what extent does this result in knowledge about […]

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‘What Would You Say if You Were Guilty?’ Suspects’ Strategies During a Hypothetical Behavior Analysis Interview Concerning a Serious Crime

A new report on the Behavior Analysis Interview is now available at the Applied Cognitive Psychology Website: Masip, J. & Herrero, C. (2013). “What would you say if you were guilty?” Suspects’ strategies during a hypothetical Behavior Analysis Interview concerning a serious crime. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 27, 60-70. doi: 10.1002/acp.2872 Previous research has shown that […]

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Coercive citations in academic journals

Wilhite and Fong (2012) published a study in Science examining requests that journal editors make to authors to cite superfluous papers published in their journal. Wilhite and Fong analyzed more than 6500 responses from a survey completed by researchers in economics, sociology, psychology, and diverse business disciplines, as well as data from more than 800 […]

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